Friday, December 12, 2008

Chapter 24

1. How does Scout feel about the women (Aunt Alexandra, Miss Rachel, Mrs. Merriweather, Miss Stephanie, and Miss Maudie) and their discussions in this chapter? How do they treat Scout?

2. What can you learn from the women of Maycomb about proper and improper behaviour?

3. Explain briefly how Tom was killed.

8 comments:

~*J3n*~ said...

3. The death of Tom Robinson was adverse and unnecessary. While the inmates were out at the exercise period, Tom was allegedly running in a "blind raving charge at the fence and started climbing over. Right in front of them-" The jail guards hollered and roared for him to release himself and surrender, when their ceaseless shouting did nothing but drive Tom on, they shot a few rounds to the sky. When this attempt to pierce Tom's heart with fear proved fruitless, they aimed to kill. They pegged him as he hopped off the fence towards freedom. According to rumor if he'd had two good arms he'd have escaped, that's how expeditiously he covered the distance to the fence. Seventeen cartridges were fired into him by the time he finally hit the ground as an inanimate corpse

Nick K. said...

1. Scout feels normal, but yet she knows she needs to act lady-like around the women. She asks the women appropriate questions to be discussed, just like a lady would. She did seem to notice one thing though, she saw Aunt Alexandra thanking Miss Maudie for stopping Mrs. Merriweather's conversation. "She gave Miss Maudie a look of pure gratitude, and i wondered at the world of women" (Lee 233). In addition to that, the women treat Scout as she if she were to be a lady, but talking to her as if she was a child. They had very good respect for each other.

Taylor said...

1. Scout feels on the spot when the discussion is directed at her, and she tries to control her temper. Otherwise, she wants nothing to do with the gathering of the women and strongly wishes to be elsewhere.

2. You can learn the supposed "Do's" and "Do Not's" of proper etiquette in Maycomb, and proper topics of conversations for example, Tom Robinson's death was not a proper conversation topic for the gathering, so Aunt Alexandra and Miss Maudie composed themselves as not to raise suspicion.

3. Tom was shot 17 times when he attempted an escape in prison. "It was during their exercise period. He just broke into a blind raving charge at the fence and started climbing over. Right in front of them..." (Lee 235)

Wayne said...

1. Scout acts like a boy and is childish, she doesn't like the discussions with the women. They treat scout like a lady but talk to her like a child and try to convince scout to be more lady-like.

Wayne said...
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Priscilla Ho (: said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Priscilla Ho (: said...

2. The women of Maycomb teaches proper etiquette and teaches you how to be well mannered and approach people in a high society manner. They also teach how one should be more lady-like and feminin around others. The women of Maycomb teach this by adressing others with class and respect.
The women of Maycomb think that it is improper behaviour for a lady to act like a boy and think that women should be house wives and take care of the men in the household. These women also think that all women should speak more, lovely, and sweet; opposed to rude and oboxious. But not only the way you speak but what you talk about is something to consider, because certain conversation topics should not be talked about in certain sitiuations.

jdot-x-tang said...

1. Scout is required to be engaged in the discussion with the women, while being more "lady-like". The women tend to condescend to her and through their perspective, Scout is a source of entertainment. Scout knows they are patronizing her and it isn't something she particularly likes. Even so, the ladies treat Scout fairly. The sequence of events in this chapter proves that the women are influencing Scout to be more obedient and polite. "'Stop that shaking', Miss Maudie commanded, and I stopped." (Lee 317)